READING – THE ULTIMATE ENTERTAINMENT GUIDE TO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS DURING ISOLATION

ALL THROUGH MY HIGH SCHOOL years, I was an avid reader of books: fiction and non-fiction, comics, magazines and so forth. I still recall that well after I had graduated from High School and university, there was a year that I read 121 novels, 79 magazines and 85 short stories.

READING books gives us an opportunity to be informed, entertained or escape as we comprehend fiction and non-fiction texts against their understanding of the world, their personal insights, opinions and finally comparing those texts to others.

I have managed to do this and even taught my children the elements of independent reading. Learning to read is challenging for many High School students and is even more so when the process is unclear. Without effective reading strategies, many students struggle and a large percentage will be left behind in High School lessons, when they are unable to acquire the skills necessary to read grade level materials.

As such, it is never too late to formulate a strategy and incorporate reading into our children’s lives. Reading enriches not only your vocabulary and writing skills, but also keeps High School students active, entertained and curious while at home during this self-isolation.

pexels-photo.jpg INDEPENDENT READING CHALLENGE

Independent reading is students’ reading of text — such as books, magazines, and newspapers — on their own, with minimal to no assistance from adults. It can consist of reading done in or out of school, including purely voluntary reading for enjoyment or assigned reading for homework.

During this period of isolation, we can actually take advantage of this predicament and implement some reading strategies for our children to pick on, by letting our home students read a book of their choosing.

Two Reading Methods Suitable @ Home

There are many reading strategies but, from the lot, I have picked on two that I have found to be most effective. This is what effective high-flying students at High School implement in their reading:

SQ3R METHOD

SQRRR or SQ3R is a comprehension strategy that helps students think about the text they are reading while they’re reading. Often categorized as a study strategy, SQ3R helps students “get it” the first time they read a text by teaching them how to read and think like an effective reader.

This strategy includes the following five steps:

  1. SURVEY: Students review the text to gain initial meaning from the headings, bolded or italicised text, footnotes and charts. Thus, scan the piece of writing to establish its purpose and get the main ideas.
  2. QUESTION: Students begin to generate questions giving purpose to improve concentration about their reading from previewing it. This aids comprehension.
  3. READ: As students read, they need to look for answers to the questions they formulated during their preview of the text. These questions, based on the structure of the text, help focus students’ reading. In other words, make notes and highlight main ideas that support the concept.
  4. RECITE: As students move through the text they should recite or rehearse the answers to their questions and make notes about their answer for later studying. Reciting helps to put the information into your long-term memory as well as putting what you have learned into your own words.
  5. REVIEW: After reading, students should review the text to answer lingering questions and recite the questions they previously answered. Reviewing each time you study will eliminate the need to “cram” for a test.

NB: There is another version of this method called the SQ4R. In this method the additional R can mean several things that you can do to add more power to your study method:

R = RELATE – It is easier to remember ideas that are personally meaningful. When you study a chapter, try to link new facts, terms, and concepts with information you already know. It could also mean wRite. This is making “maps” for yourself; reducing the information and rereading or skimming to locate and prove your points, as well as writing down the key terms and ideas in outline form. Lastly, the R also means RECORD. This is marking the textbook increases understanding of the material for the present and for future reference. The process of selecting and marking requires you to find the main ideas. Later, when you review the text for exam purposes, you will find that the textbook markings and highlights enable you to grasp the essential points without having to read entire paragraphs and chapters again.

THE KWL READING STRATEGY

This is an instructional technique used to improve reading comprehension. It also improves a student’s ability to remember the material. KWL is most often used with expository reading materials such as classroom textbooks, research articles, and journalistic pieces.

KWL is a research strategy. The approximate acronym stands for

  • What I KNOW
  • What I WANT to Know, and
  • What I LEARNED.”

Many students and teachers also use it as a reading comprehension aid: The KWL is a BEFORE, DURING and AFTER reading and learning strategy.

It is used to connect a student’s prior knowledge to what they are actively learning using three key techniques in that:

  • The student begins by thinking about what they already know about the topic.
  • Next, they think about what they want to know or find out.
  • Finally, they actively learn something new about the topic.

This method explicitly teaches key reading comprehension and learning skills through making connections, self-questioning, visualising, inferring, determining importance, summarising, synthesising and self-monitoring. Consequently, it helps students become more purposeful, active readers, thinkers and learners.

Library Reading

25 READING STRATEGIES YOU CAN DO @ HOME

These strategies enhance students’ comprehensive reading skills. By using some of these techniques, parents can help High School students, to able to understand the material and direct their attention to the details. Subsequently, these strategies enhance students’ learning and help them prepare for an essay or report submission or even for a test.

  1. ACTIVATING BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE – It is an undisputable fact that better comprehension occurs when students are engaged in activities that bridge their old knowledge with the new. For example, a simple question like “what do you know about … (a particular topic)” will stimulate students’ previous knowledge of that topic. This will help them connect the current reading to their already existing knowledge and make the new reading more stimulating and engaging. The strategy allows students to work their way up from an already existing schema, instead of starting a new one.
  2. QUESTIONING – This encourages students to frame questions before and after reading to increase their comprehension. There are three main questions to reflect on:
    1. A ‘right now question’ focuses on the material presented. What is the essence of the material read? What are the facts that are being mentioned?
    2. An ‘analytical question’ requires students to ponder over what they have learnt. What does the author want me to understand from this material?
    3. A ‘research question’ encourages the students to look for information beyond what is in the text. This allows for more comprehensive active learning to occur.
  3. COLLAGEThis is a collection or combination of various themes/ideas/images/techniques in a text being read. This could be creating an individual collage around themes/symbolism/ characters in the book/magazine/short stories.
  4. ANALYZING TEXT STRUCTURE – This requires students to learn how to analyze or comprehend the structure of a text: The five key techniques are Exposition/Introduction; Rising Action; Conflict; Falling Action and Resolution/Denouement. It can also be in the form of cause-effect pattern, problem-solution pattern, or a descriptive pattern like a list, web or a matrix pattern. They should also be taught to make use of subheadings, labels, captions, tables, graphs, etc. as these help students to understand the material better.
  5. READER RESPONSE – Pick the most important word/line/image/object/event in the chapter and explain why you chose it. Be sure to support all analysis with examples.
  6. NOTES AND QUOTES – This applies more to a prescribed text, be it at GCSE/AP English/IB. Draw a line down the middle of the page. On one side write down important quotes, on the other comment on and analyze the quotes.
  7. TEXT TO SELF – Based upon a book you have just read, share a story about yourself that is related to an event or character that was in the book. It is probably best done in the form of a written  recount. Link your experience to no more than four situations that occurred within the text. Thus, text to self is  a great opportunity for students to become introspective about the content they read and make comparisons to their own experiences in life.
  8. VISUALIZATION – Students should be encouraged to form visual images in their head as they read the text, which will help in better comprehension. Research suggests that students should visualize them as structural images or diagrams instead of mere pictures, as pictures have a tendency to fade.
  9. ROUND TABLE – This is an opportunity to give students a chance to talk about what intrigues, bothers, confuses them about the book/story they are reading. Just be a good listener and a keen participant.
  10. DEAR DIARY – Let the High School student place oneself in the shoes of one of the characters they have just read about and write a diary entry of a key moment from the story. Try to choose a moment in the story in which the character has  plenty of interaction and emotion to share in a diary entry. It is usually written from a first person perspective not always written  in present tense.
  11. INSPIRATIONS – Watch a film inspired by a story and then compare and contrast: eg – The Imitation Game tells the story of computer scientist Alan Turing, who tries to crack the Enigma code that the Nazis used to provide security for their radio messages during WWII. American Sniper is a dramatic adaptation by Clint Eastwood, who is a visceral account of Navy SEAL sniper Chris Kyle, whose pinpoint accuracy saved countless lives and turned him into a legend during the war in Iraq.
  12. YOU HAVE THREE WISHES – Imagine a genie lands in the midpoint of the story you have just read and grants the protagonists/antagonists three wishes. Formulate those wishes.
  13. FISHBOWL – This is an impromptu or scheduled task with two to four family members sitting in the middle of a circle and talking about the text. The others make observations about the conversation then rotate into the circle.
  14. MOVIE REVIEW – This is a follow up of #14. The student writes a review of (or discuss) a movie based on a story they have read. Compare and contrast the text to the movie adaptation
  15. DEAR AUTHOR – After reading a book encourage the student to write a letter  or send an email to the author. You may be surprised by the response. Letters via the publisher are always forwarded to the author.
  16. DIG DEEPER ON THE WEB – This applies to prescribed texts or if you are just doing it out of interest. Prior to, while, or after reading a book, research the book, its author, or its subject online.
  17. TIME MACHINE – Instead of traveling into the book, write a scene or story in which the character(s) travel out of the book into today.
  18. BIOGRAPHY – Write a biography of one of the characters who most interests you.
  19. AUTOBIOGRAPHY – Have the character that most interests you write their autobiography of the time before, during, or after the story occurs.
  20. DEAR CLASSMATE – Using email or some other means of corresponding, write each other about the book as you read it, having a written conversation about the book.
  21. WHAT DO THEY WISH FOR AND WHY? – Consider this – the protagonists/antagonists would their wishes have changed anything about the story?  How so? Again think about the cause and effect relationship and how this may have altered the path of the book you have been reading.
  22. AFTER READING: After reading several of the next chapters in your book…
    1. For Fiction: write a one page response analyzing the characters, and their motivations. Consider the conflict, setting, relationships of characters and any other significant details that you find important.
    2. For Non-Fiction: write a one page explaining what you learned and how it confirmed, challenged or changed your thinking today. Tell your reader how you became smarter about that topic.
  23. P.S. – The term comes from the Latin post scriptum, an expression meaning “written after” (which may be interpreted in the sense of “that which comes after the writing”). Thus, after you read the story, write an epilogue in which you explain – using whatever tense and tone the author does – what happened to the character(s) next.
  24. SUMMARIZING – The last technique is to summarize the material read. Research has indicated that the ability to summarize enhances comprehension. A summary is the ability to condense main ideas, and connect major themes into concise statements that capture the purpose of a reading for the reader.A student making use of the other four strategies will find it easier to summarize the material. They can summarize the material in the form of diagrams, either visually or in writing.
  25. Finally, complete the BOOK REVIEW CHALLENGE by taking a comprehensive task here using the Scott County word document.

Dear Parents and Guardians: Talk with your children about the books they are reading.

Reading a BookWHERE DO I GET THE BOOKS?

If you would like an e-book, go to https://www.nypl.org/books-music-movies/ebookcentral

I have also compiled two earlier posts on books to read for High School students. You can access a range of books on the link here:

50 MUST-READ NOVELS BEFORE LEAVING HIGH SCHOOL

You could be starting something new and exciting which would be a lifelong hobby. Take up the challenge and enjoy.

Good luck in all your endeavours.

As of old . . .

BE EMPOWERED AND EXCEL

36 PRODUCTIVE WAYS TO KILL THE TIME FOR OUR STUDENTS @ HIGH SCHOOL DURING ISOLATION

AS MILLIONS of parents around the world grapple with the school closures in the past weeks, and having no idea when they’ll be opened, something has to be done to occupy the young minds. Many schools have been hastily scrabbling together remote learning plans, but things are going to be chaotic and unstructured and that’s something we’ll all have to learn to deal with.

The bottom line is, we, as parents, have to find productive ways to engage the restless young people at home 24/7. The key is not to panic, but also not to bury our head in the sand. These are tough times, but there are many things we can do to ease the pain of the current situation and move on with life. It is a phase which we will fight and overcome.

AS A RESULT, I have compiled a list of handy and productive things to do during this turbulence. Please scroll down the list of sub-headings below and pick on what interests you and get engaged:

  1. Reflections & Reading
  2. Television At Work
  3. Grammar, Vocabulary & Spelling
  4. Entering The Working World At Home
  5. Dear Parents . . .
  6. Out & About In The Community
  7. What More & Others
  8. Finally, Be Grateful . . .

So, don’t feel overwhelmed.

INSTEAD, develop a realistic plan and engage the children in your planning. As you follow your plan, I’m confident that you’ll have a meaningful, productive, and fun-filled set of things to do during this unprecedented isolation.  

REFLECTIONS & READING

1. Reflect On The Semester/Term Gone By

DEAR Student – This is a moment to take out your journal or a sheet of paper and answer these three questions as honestly and candidly as possible. You are taking stock of your performance in a self-regulatory manner.

  • What did I do well in the past semester/term?
  • What did I not do so well in the past semester/term?
  • What will I do differently in the coming semester/term?

2. Set Process Goals For The Coming Semester/Term

This is a follow-up to the above point, even if we are not sure as to when we shall be going back to school or work.

SURELY, by setting process goals for the coming semester/term instead of performance goals, becomes a priority. I am saying process goals first as process goals are what you intend to do, while performance goals are what you intend to achieve. As a result, process goals are far more effective.

Here is an example.

  • PERFORMANCE GOAL: Improve my essay writing skills.
  • PROCESS GOAL: Do two extra essay questions every day after dinner.

This actually means by setting process goals, you’re more likely to take action than if you only set performance goals.

3. Create Checklists

For tasks you perform repeatedly, create checklists so that you’ll save time in the long run.

For example, you could create a checklist for the things you ought to do …

  • Every day when I get home from school/training/work, I …
  • When I start preparing for an exam, I …
  • Every weekend as I prepare for the upcoming week, I …
  • When I am packing my bag, I …
  • Before I take an exam, I …

By doing so, aim to reflect on your life periodically; and positively, you will enjoy more.

4. Start Your SAT Or ACT Test Prep – (I)GCSE/IB Program 

Strictly speaking no one calls these acronyms by their full names: SAT stands for Scholastic Assessment Test and ACT is the American College Test. Although they are very much American, universities around the world accept them for admission purposes just like the UK’s (I)GCSE – General Certificate of Secondary Education; and IB (International Baccalaureate) Diploma. Always do your research on what exactly you want to achieve.

This could be a great time to explore the ACT vs SAT , practice for the PSAT , or ramp up your study schedule. Pick up a prep book, take an online prep course , or find a test prep tutor to help you manage your time.

Test prep keeps your brain active so you are in tiptop shape to head back to school later when things get back to normal.

5. Take A Free Online College Course

There are some wonderful websites – like edX; Coursera, Khan Academy or Udemy – that offer courses that are taped or streamed from universities. With tons of subjects from robotics to poetry, you get to participate in real-time or watch videos with up to date information. It is a world of wonder out there. Just click on the link below and enjoy.

EdX is a global nonprofit learning community with over 20 million learners having access to over 2500+ online courses. EdX is fulfilling the demand for people to learn on their own terms delivering courses for curious minds on topics ranging from data and computer science to leadership and communications.

Coursera  is building skills with courses, certificates, and degrees online from world-class universities and companies. There are over 3 900 courses to choose from.

Khan Academy is a tried and tested institution offering personalized learning where students practice at their own pace, first filling in gaps in their understanding and then accelerating their learning.

Udemy wants you to explore possibilities with its wide selection of courses and thousands of online video courses. Courses range from business, design, photography, development, IT and Software, marketing as well as personal development.

6. Read, Read and More Reading

As an avid reader, I strongly recommend that you take to do some reading during this turbulent time. I have a list of books here from which you can choose from:

50 MUST-READ NOVELS BEFORE LEAVING HIGH SCHOOL

Besides, the above books, I would like to recommend you to read these FIVE books:

  • Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl

Psychiatrist Viktor Frankl’s memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, finding meaning in it, and moving forward with renewed hope and purpose.

  • How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie

This is one of the most famous confidence-boosting book ever published; with sales of over 16 million copies worldwide. The book offers practical advice and techniques, in an exuberant and conversational style, on how to get out of a mental rut and make life more rewarding.

  • The Success Principles by Jack Canfield

Get ready to transform yourself for success in this practical and inspiring guide that will help any aspiring person get from where they are to where they want to be. Thus, Canfield offers readers practical help and inspiration for getting from where they are, to where they want to be.

  • Feel the Fear … and Do It Anyway by Susan Jeffers

Are you afraid of making decisions . . . leaving an unfulfilling relationship . . . facing the future? Whatever your fear, here is your chance to push through it once and for all. In this enduring guide to self-empowerment, Dr. Susan Jeffers inspires us with dynamic techniques and profound concepts that have helped countless people grab hold of their fears and move forward with their lives.

  • The Happy Student by Daniel Wong

Are you a happy, motivated student? Or do you drag yourself to class every morning? In The Happy Student, Daniel Wong describes the five key steps you need to take in order to become both a successful and happy student. Wong draws on his personal journey—from unhappy overachiever to a happy straight-A student, as a result, guiding you through your own transformational process.

pexels-photo-261895.jpegTELEVISION AT WORK

7. Watch Educational Youtube Videos

YouTube is full of educational stuff which is quite helpful during this upheaval. Here are a few of my favorite educational YouTube channels:

8. Watch Documentaries And Your Favourites

You can watch thousands of high-quality documentaries for free at Documentary Heaven besides browsing through your favourite television programmes and films.

If you are subscribed to Netflix, Amazon Prime and many others, this is an opportunity to watch some really great documentaries as well. Despite the abundance of entertainment, . .

REMEMBER to watch in moderation as there are other things to be performed, done and completed.

9. Play Video Games Too

The popularity of video, computer, online, and virtual reality games is great when done in moderation. This is to avoid the potential for negative health effects of gaming, including the potential for addiction.

The exhibition of superior visual, spatial and attention skills derived from video games is great and video games formats have been successfully used to deliver health interventions to children and adolescents. If interested in playing games, try the . . .

50 Educational Video Games That Homeschoolers Love

pexels-photo.jpgGRAMMAR, VOCABULARY & SPELLING

10. Sprucing Up Your Grammar

By the time students enter High School, they will have conquered and mastered the uses of a period/full stop, the comma, various uses of the capital letters, the question mark and the apostrophe BUT . . . many, and I mean the majority of students, would know what a colon or semi-colon looks like; ellipsis; brackets and dashes; but wouldn’t know when or how to use them.

This is what I want to share with you here: AWESOME WAYS TO RAISE YOUR GRADE IN ENGLISH @ HIGH SCHOOL 1 – 4 on where, how and when to use these punctuation marks. You will explore the uses in greater depth here.

Throughout my teaching career, as well as being a GCSE/IGCSE and GCE Examiner, I have noticed that these unusual punctuation marks are rarely used. Yet by using . . .

  • colons (:) and semi-colons (;)
  • the hyphen, dashes (-)
  • parenthesis/brackets ( ), [ ]
  • ellipsis (. . .) and . . .
  • using numbers in writing

enhances a student’s writing repertoire.

11. Practising Idioms

Brainstorm common idioms and practice new ones. Here I have got a list of idioms for you. Try writing a sentence using some of them.

You will love reading and practising endless hours of Common Idioms In Use 1 – 8 in one of my posts.

12. Where Is the Synonym?

This combines English vocabulary practice with the classic game of memory embedded in contextual meaning of words in sentences.

Again, I have got an array of exercises for you to pick on my highly regarded . . VOCABULARY WORKSHOP – THE KEY WORDS TO USE IN WRITING OR SPEAKING COMPETENTLY 1-7. Just follow the link.

13. What Are Homophones?

HOMOPHONES are two or more words that sound alike, but have different meanings or spellings.

In the sentence below, for example, every word is spelled correctly but three words are the wrong words, and even a spellchecker will not flag one of them.

Can you spot the homophones in the sentence below?

I herd the reign ruined there picnic.

One great way to improve spelling skills is to learn the correct spellings and meanings of common sets of homophones at . . .

HOMOPHONES: MOST COMMONLY CONFUSED WORDS @ HIGH SCHOOL 1 – 8

14. Learning The Root Of Words

A root word is the most basic form of a word. This is the basic word to which affixes (prefixes and suffixes) form the basis of a new word.

  • The root word can also be a word in its own right. For example, the word lovely consists of the word love and the suffix -ly.
  • In contrast, a root is the basis of a new word, but it does not typically form a stand-alone word on its own. For example, the word reject is made up of the prefix re- and the Latin root ject, which is not a stand-alone word.

Root words can help you to break down large, new words into smaller units to discover their meanings. Here are only ten common root words.

Please access the rest through here.

Common Latin Roots
Latin Root Definition Examples
ambi both ambiguous, ambidextrous
aqua water aquarium, aquamarine
aud to hear audience, audition
bene good benefactor, benevolent
cent one hundred century, percent
circum around circumference, circumstance
contra/counter against contradict, encounter
dict to say dictation, dictator
duc/duct to lead conduct, induce
mal bad malevolent, malefactor
Common Greek Roots
Greek Root Definition Examples
anthropo man; human; humanity anthropologist, philanthropy
auto self autobiography, automobile
bio life biology, biography
chron time chronological, chronic
dyna power dynamic, dynamite
dys bad; hard; unlucky dysfunctional, dyslexic
graph writing graphic, phonograph
hetero different heteronym, heterogeneous
homo same homonym, homogenous
phobia fear claustrophobia, phobic

15. Learn Prefixes and Suffixes To Expand Your Vocabulary

Learning the meanings of common prefixes and suffixes can help you understand unknown English words you come across everyday. It can also help you become better at spelling words too.

A PREFIX is a letter or a group of letters that we add to the beginning of a word. Prefixes change the meanings of words. For example, the prefix un- (or u-n) can mean “not,” “remove,” or “opposite.” Adding un- to the word “happy” gives you the word “unhappy,” which means not happy.

U-n and r-e (or re-) are the two most common prefixes in the English language. Re- means “again” or “back,” such as in the words “rethink” “redo” and “repay.”

Here are a few things to remember when learning prefixes:

  • Different prefixes in English can have similar meanings, such as un-, in- and non- all of which mean “not” or “opposite of.”
  • Also, the prefixes mis- and ir- mean “wrong,” “wrongly,” or “incorrectly.”
  • Notice that double letters are possible. For example, when you add the prefix im- to words that begin with the letter “m,” you get two “m”s as in “immeasurable.” That’s also true when you add un- to words that begin with the letter “n,” as in “unnoticeable.” The same is true for many other prefixes.
  • When adding a prefix to a word, the spelling of the base word never changes. For example, the prefix un- did not change the spelling of the word “happy.” And, the prefix re- would not change the spelling of the word “live” in “relive.”
  • Watch out for “lookalikes” – words that look like they contain prefixes but, in fact, do not. For example, the un- in the word “uncle” is not a prefix, nor is the re- in the words “reach” or “real.”

A SUFFIX is a letter or group of letters added to the end of a word. Suffixes are commonly used to show the part of speech of a word. For example, adding “ion” to the verb “act” gives us “action,” the noun form of the word. Suffixes also tell us the verb tense of words or whether the words are plural or singular.

​Some common suffixes are -er, -s, -es, -ed, -ing and -ly.

There are additional suffix rules, but they deal with spelling and can be learned with time and practice.

A thing to keep in mind about both prefixes and suffixes is that some are only used with some words. For example, we add the suffix -ful to some nouns to mean “full of,” such as in the words “beautiful” or “helpful.”

But, we cannot add -ful to just any noun. You could not, for example, say “loveful” to mean full of love.

So, what are some ways that you can practice common prefixes and suffixes?

One way is to use online flashcards from websites like Quizlet. You can choose sets of cards that are already made or create and use your own sets. Or, you can make your own flashcards with pieces of paper.

Please access the rest through this link:

 16. Spelling Generalizations

I boast to my students that I can spell any word in English because I mastered the spelling rules in primary school. I challenge you to emulate that.

The 5 Common English Spelling Rules to Improve Your Writing are . . .

  1. I before E: Write i before e when the sound is long e except after the letter c. – eg: relieve, relief, reprieve. When there is a c preceding, then it is ei : receipt, receive, deceive, conceive .
  2. Double consonants: When b, d, g, m, n, or p appear after a short vowel in a word with two syllables, double the consonant – eg: rabbit, manner, dagger or drummer.
  3. When to use -US and -OUS: eg – radius, previous
  4. Q is always followed by U: eg – Queen, quarrel
  5. The ch sound: At the beginning of a word, use ch. At the end of a word, use tch. When the ch sound is followed by ure or ion, use t – eg: choose, champ, watch, catch, picture, rapture

A comprehensive list of spelling rules can be accessed through here:

WatchENTERING THE WORKING WORLD AT HOME

17. Create Your Own Project

Turn your interests and talents into your own long-term project. A few ideas:

  • Form a garage band with some musically-inclined friends and practice.
  • Teach yourself how to program.
  • Practice your creative writing and submit your work to journals that publish high school students or to your school’s newsletter.

18. Get A job – “Take a job for what you will learn, not for what you will earn.”

Colleges are impressed when students have jobs, whether they are working for family income or just for fun. Your work history demonstrates your initiative and responsibility. Take note: you may need a permit, depending on your age.

Don’t worry too much about what the job will pay. As the saying goes, “Take a job for what you will learn, not for what you will earn.” This is especially true when it comes to school holiday jobs. The best learning experience might just come in the form of an unpaid job or internship

Colleges love to see collaboration, so try to spend some time working with others versus only on solo projects.

 19. Be An Entrepreneur

Start a business with friends that offers a service in your community. We’ve heard of students starting babysitters’ clubs, walking dogs for the neighborhood, or even teaching Skype/WhatsApp messaging to the elderly.

20. Apply For Internships

Even if we are in the middle of a crisis, be optimistic and set things in motion. Introduce yourself to the world of internships.

This is chance to spruce up your CV and resume, so before you start applying for roles, it’s important to make sure that your resume is up to date and includes your relevant skills and experience.

AN INTERNSHIP is a structured opportunity to work (usually unpaid) at a company, lab, or non-profit organization for a set amount of time. These can be very competitive for high school students, but opportunities are out there!

At Amazon Jobs, besides providing graduate jobs, they also offer student internships with an in depth internship timeline profile providing the opportunity to accelerate your growth. They work on challenging projects which breed resourcefulness and invention with talented teams.

TeenLife is a the leading directory for High School students’ academic and enrichment opportunities for summer programs, volunteer opportunities, gap year programs and community service. The TeenLife website is dense with information which can help you in your future – start preparing now

21. Find a Job-Shadowing Opportunity

Job shadowing (or work shadowing) is an on-the-job learning, career development, and leadership development program. It is  a useful way to learn about a particular job of interest involving spending time following a professional in that job. Observing the life of the professional for anywhere from a few hours to as long as a week can help give you a sense of what that job really is like

Does your dad’s best friend work at an electrical engineering company? Ask if you can help with filing or sit in a planning meeting or two, all while soaking up the atmosphere.

In short, job shadowing helps you expand your network as well as making professional contacts in your career field of interest. When shadowing someone who is competent in his or her career field, you have the opportunity to gain a useful resource as you begin to seek and apply for jobs and internships.

NOW is the time to plan it!

22. Learn a New Skill

You could learn skills like Public Speaking; Cooking; Drawing through . . .

TakeLessons – Get live instruction in music, language, dance, computer skills and more one-on-one with an instructor. You can search by area or by subject.

Power Homeschool – Power Homeschool offers self-paced, interactive video lessons on topics such as foreign language, physical education, fine arts, and career and technical classes.

MasterClass – MasterClass offers self-paced courses taught by masters in their fields. You can take photography from Annie Leibovitz, cooking from Gordon Ramsey, or directing from Ron Howard.

Outschool Outschool offers over 4,000 classes taught live to small groups using video chat.

23. Learn A New Language

Visit these websites and learn a new language:

  • Duolingo is not a stand-alone language course, but it’s an excellent addition to a language learner’s toolbox. It’s easy to use, it’s fun and it works. If your aim is to achieve real fluency, remember to read, speak, and truly live the language that you’re learning!
  • Babbel is a German-based language learning app and e-learning platform, currently offering 14 different languages ranging from German, English (US + UK), French, to Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese and Italian, among many others.
  • BBC Languages is a free online language learning site which offer courses, audio, video and games, including the alphabet, phrases, vocabulary, pronunciation, grammar, activities and tests.

Just go to the site and follow the links.

24. Start A Family Or Neighborhood Book Club

A book club is a reading group, usually consisting of a number of people who read and talk about books based on a topic or an agreed-upon reading list. It’s common for book clubs to choose a specific book to read and discuss at the same time. Formal book clubs meet on a regular basis at a set location.

This sounds a bit daunting but with careful planning, you can get things going so easily.

Rather on a very small scale, a parent and child can form a book club, by reading the same book and chatting about it. What more, if you invite your cousins and friends? Just start small and grow

25. Try a Ballet, Dance Or Martial Arts Class – all for free

Lots of businesses running after-school and weekend clubs have been quick to adapt to the change and are offering online classes, with many being streamed for free. Good examples include:

The Facebook Group Online Classes For Kids is fast becoming a hub for virtual classes, with a number of different activities already on offer.

YouTube has endless classes are available for families to stream whenever they want – giving parents a much-needed immediate release for energetic children.

This has the benefit of giving structure to your day or weekend, you can make sure children get dressed and ready for the class as they would normally, only they are staying indoors for the session.

red heart on a old opened book

Photo by Kaboompics .com on Pexels.com

DEAR PARENTS . . .

26. Instill Organizational Skills – Establish ROUTINES

LEARNING AND MASTERING the skills of getting organized, staying focused, and seeing work through to the end will help High School students in just about everything they do. But this is not usually explicitly taught in High School, so our students can benefit from some parental guidance with organization and time-management skills.

Parents and guardians can help our High School students through a variety of ways by helping  them establish routines by . . .

  •  KEEPING  assignments and class information together in binders, notebooks, or folders that are organized by subject.
  • CREATING a calendar will help teens recognize upcoming deadlines and plan their time accordingly. Don’t forget to have your teen include non-academic commitments on the calendar, too.
  •  MAKING prioritized daily to-do lists, and to study and do homework in a well-lit, quiet, orderly workspace.
  • REMINDING your teen that when it comes to studying and homework, multitasking is a time-waster.
  • WORKING in an environment free of distractions like TV and mobile phones works best.

27. Make Time to Talk About School

Because many teens spend so much of the day outside the home — at school, extracurricular activities, jobs, or with peers — staying connected with them can be challenging for parents and guardians. While activities at school, new interests, and expanding social circles are central to the lives of High School students, parents and guardians are still their anchors for providing love, guidance, and support.

Make efforts to talk with your teen every day, so he or she knows that what goes on at school is important to you. When teens know their parents are interested in their academic lives, they’ll take school seriously as well.

Because communication is a two-way street, the way you talk and listen to your teen can influence how well he or she listens and responds. It’s important to listen carefully, make eye contact, and avoid multitasking while you chat.

Remember to talk with your teen, not at him or her.

Be sure to ask open-ended questions that go beyond “yes” or “no” answers.

28. Offer Help With Studying

Planning is key for helping your teen study while juggling assignments in multiple subjects. Since grades really count in high school, planning for studying is crucial for success, particularly when your teen’s time is taken up with extracurricular activities.

When there’s a lot to study, help your teen to break down tasks into smaller chunks and stick to the studying calendar schedule so he or she isn’t studying for multiple tests all in one night. Remind your teen to take notes in class, organize them by subject, and review them at home.

If grades are good, your teen may not need help studying. If grades begin to slip, however, it may be time to step in.

Most parents still need to help their teen with organization and studying — don’t think that teens can do this on their own just because they’re in High School!

29. Prepare a Meal or Special Dish

Food is one of our favorite ways to learn about any subject! This is an excellent time and way to learn about spices, foods, or cooking techniques that are popular in a specific location.

Food can also be a useful learning tool when studying history. Recipes and ingredients often change over time so preparing foods from a different time period can be a lot of fun.

BBC Good Food – It teaches kids to cook with the step-by-step lessons and recipes turning the little chefs with easy and fun cooking projects. They’ll love tasting their handiwork, too!

ground group growth hands

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

OUT & ABOUT IN THE COMMUNITY

30. Find A Cause You Care About

If you say that something is for a good cause, you mean that it is worth doing or giving to because it will help other people, for example by raising money for charity. The Raleigh International Bike Ride is open to anyone who wants to raise money for a good cause.

Find a cause you care about, and start thinking of ways to support that cause. Some of the good causes one can take part in include children and family services, youth development services, crisis services, shelter and homeless services, food banks, food pantries and food distribution; and caring for the elderly.

31. Volunteer In Your Community

Colleges would rather see continuity and commitment to a community service activity instead of a bunch of one-offs. Start now, and volunteer two hours a week through your senior year.

Volunteering doesn’t take any special skills or extensive experience – and there’s never a shortage of organizations looking for help.

Some local places which you can try include spending your Saturday mornings feeding animals at the animal shelter or national parks; food pantries and soup kitchens always use a helping hand organizing a local food drive, raising money, or simply handing out hot meals to those in need; and visiting  residents at nursing homes a few days a week. Red Cross offers an extensive list of positions that can help those in need and bolster your resume at the same time.

Thus, once you begin your volunteer position, don’t hesitate to offer help outside of your assigned job.

32. Improve Your Physical Health And Well-Being

You have more time at home  now, so introduce  yourself to some basic routines.

Start small and build up consistency by drinking more water and fewer sugary drinks; eating more fruits and vegetables and less fast food; exercising regularly: You don’t have to become a gym member to exercise.

Lastly, get a good night’s sleep.

33. Build Or Fix Something And Spruce Up Your Bedroom

Fix a broken fan, build a computer, or make a table. These are skills that will come in handy in the future. What more, make your room  look tidy too!

You’ll get an immediate dose of interest by simply bringing in a plant,  rearranging your furniture layout, adding a mirror, hanging your favorite painting, print, poster, quilt, or collection of family photos wall art

20190802_152255WHAT MORE & OTHERS

34. Explore Outer Space With NASA

The NASA website is packed full of free activities and worksheets for students interested in outer space.

The NASA website is utterly astounding! Curiosity and exploration are vital to the human spirit and accepting the challenge of going deeper into space is an interesting adventure one would explore to.

35. Use Your Imagination

The sky’s the limit! Start a summer art project with friends to beautify a rundown area of your community. Pick up trash in your local park every Sunday. Colleges love to see collaboration, so try to spend your summer working with others versus only on solo projects.

FINALLY, BE GRATEFUL . . .

36. Write Thank-You Notes

Many people say “thank you” via text message or email. But few people write actual thank-you notes. This school holiday, become one of those people.

Make a list of the people who have helped you in one way or another the past semester: friends, teachers, relatives, and family members.

Write each of those people a thank-you note. Then either mail the note to them or give it to them in person.

Dear Reader, This is by any chance an exhaustive list you can do during this unprecedented time we are living in. You can be creative – thinking outside the box and come up with a lot more others. This is only the start.

Good luck in your endeavours.

BE EMPOWERED AND EXCEL

 

 

BRILLIANT IDEAS ON WRITING A SYNTHESIS ESSAY

The ADVANCED PLACEMENT ENGLISH LANGUAGE & COMPOSITION requires the candidate to write three types of essays. This paper tests the candidate’s reading and writing skills; and as such, examiners and teachers agree that top scores are awarded to those students who can confidently analyse how authors of no-fiction prose use various techniques to convey meaning and create effects. In addition, the students have to write three well organized and insightful essays, each with a different purpose.

These THREE types of essays fall under:

  • Synthesis Essay
  • Argumentative Essay
  • Analytical Essay

WatchSYNTHESIS ESSAY

The main purpose of a synthesis essay is to make insightful connections from several published documents – called sources – related to the issue at hand, each less than a page long. One source will be an image – a photo, a chart, map, cartoon, or other visual presentation also related to the issue.

FIFTEEN minutes are allotted to the reading of the sources.

A Typical Synthesis Essay Question

Directions: The following question is based on the accompanying seven sources.

This question requires you to synthesize a variety of sources into a coherent, well-written essay. When you synthesize sources you refer to them to develop your position and cite them accurately. Your argument should be central; the sources should support this argument. Avoid merely summarizing sources.

Remember to attribute both direct and indirect citations.

After this, you are expected to write an essay that takes a position on the issue and incorporates, or synthesizes at least three of the sources into your discussion. Thus, in order to write a successful synthesis essay, you must gather research on your chosen sources, discover meaningful connections through your chosen sources, and develop a unique and interesting argument or perspective.

A Synthesis Is Not a Summary

A synthesis is an opportunity to create new knowledge out of already existing knowledge, i.e., other sources. You combine, “synthesize,” the information in your sources to develop an argument or a unique perspective on a topic. Your thesis statement becomes a one-sentence claim that presents your perspective and identifies the new knowledge that you will create.

In short, a synthesis essay must do all the following:

  • It accurately reports information from the sources using different phrases and sentences.
  • It is organized in such a way that readers can immediately see where the information from the sources overlap.
  • It makes sense of the sources and helps the reader understand them in greater depth.
  • The writer clearly promotes an idea; understands how to use a variety of sources, including non-print text (pictures, graphs, etc.), using this “synthesis” to support that idea.
  • The writer uses quotes or phrases to extract key information as well as demonstrating understanding in using these quotes or phrases.

The essay must be thesis-driven, so form a thesis based on the prompt:

What you plan to argue + How you plan to argue it = Thesis

pexels-photo.jpgWhat Do I Need to Write One?

Writing a successful synthesis essay will require you to do four things:

  1. Read accurately and objectively;
  2. See relations among different viewpoints;
  3. Define a thesis based on these relations, and
  4. Support the thesis effectively.

You will not discuss all the points in every source; but you should use e some of the sources, and you should use points from each that are appropriate for the thesis of your own essay.

How Do I Write It?

A synthesis essay may be developed in several ways, including the following:

READ CAREFULLY First, skimming through the readings and look for similar issues in each essay. Reflect on those issues, and jot down your ideas. Reread and decide on one topic that will unify your essay. Note each essay’s thesis and main points.

Finally, take notes and write your . . .

THESIS SUPPORTED BY EXAMPLES. Develop a thesis based on common points among the works, and Support the thesis with appropriate examples from each work. This strategy works well with essays that approach a subject from highly diverse viewpoints.

COMPARISON AND CONTRAST. Discuss the similarities and differences in the writers’ viewpoints and draw whatever conclusions are possible from your comparison.

ARGUMENT. If you have a clearly defined opinion about the subject, support that opinion by incorporating the valid viewpoints of the writers of the essays you have selected,. Still, try to analyze weaknesses of any ideas you feel are not valid; identifying conflicting ideas as well as overcoming opposing viewpoints!

In particular, your essay will show whether you can . . .

  • judge the best sources to back up your position.
  • incorporate other writers’ claims or explanations into your own argument.
  • draw on sources in the order that develops your argument in the most logical, persuasive way.

What Steps Should I Take In Writing This Essay?

REMEMBER: Keep in mind that your goal is to support and illustrate your own ideas with the ideas of others to make a point. Similarly, early in your paper, mention the titles and authors of the sources you will be discussing. Quote or paraphrase brief passages from the sources to show how the essay illustrate, agree with, or disagree with each point you make. Whenever you quote or paraphrase, cite the author properly.

INTRODUCTION: It helps your readers make a transition between their own world and the issues you will be writing about; it gives your readers the tools they need to get into your topic and care about what you are saying.

Usually one paragraph contains a one-sentence statement (thesis) that sums up the focus of the essay.

BODY PARAGRAPHS: These are organized by theme, point, similarity, or aspect of the topic.

  • Each paragraph deals with one specific point/idea that relates to the thesis.
  • Each paragraph begins with a topic sentence – letting the reader know what the paragraph is about and includes information from more than one source.
  • Indicates where information comes from with either lead in phrases and verbs of attribution: According to _______ states_______ affirms_______ explains OR with MLA citation (use parenthetical).
  • Shows the similarities or differences between the different sources in ways that make the paper informative.
  • Represents the texts fairly — even if that seems to weaken your paper! Try to avoid relying on one source and just filling in others to meet the required number of sources.
  • Direct quote vs. Paraphrase – When drawing a source to your argument, you have a choice of paraphrasing (summarizing in your own words and making it easier to incorporate someone else’s ideas smoothly into your own words) what the author says, or quoting some of his or her words directly (within quotation marks, of course). Several quotes may make your essay appear to be more of a copy and paste exercise than a synthesis. So, if an author uses a particularly striking phrase or unusual wording that would be difficult to paraphrase accurately, then an occasional direct quote would make your essay more vivid.

Refuting Opposing Viewpoints

There are moments you may want to include a counterargument or refutation pointing out weaknesses in the evidence likely to be used by someone who disagrees with you. Essentially, a counterargument is highly desirable because it weakens your opponent’s position while strengthening yours. It adds potency to an essay that cannot be achieved in any other way.

Please note that there is no rule that tells you where in your essay to put a counterargument. Sometimes it fits best near the end of an essay, just before the conclusion. At other times it should be stated early in the essay. It can also be discussed briefly in each paragraph. Just practise doing it!

CONCLUSION: Your conclusion may cover some of these . . .

  • Remind readers of the most significant themes and how they connect to the overall topic.
  • Go beyond a mere summary — offer the reader insight into the significance of the exploration of the topic.
  • Your conclusion provides a bridge to help your readers transition back to their daily lives. Ultimately, it helps them see why all your analysis and information should matter to them after they put the paper down.

Having a Conversation With Your Sources

Since your aim is synthesis, you need to weave the three sources into your own discussion of the prompt using them to support and develop the position you have chosen to take. The exam writers offer a helpful image of how to do that: they call it having a conversation with your sources. This means responding to each person’s comments, building on them, using them to enrich your own views about the topic as well as trying to understand the author’s position and adding your own ideas to the discussion. This becomes a fruitful conversation!

writing-notes-idea-conference.jpgA Word About Plagiarism

Be certain to properly cite your sources!

Go back over your paper and make certain you have properly cited all sources. You can use verbs of attribution or use parenthetical citations.

Accidental plagiarism most often occurs when writers are synthesizing sources and do not indicate where the synthesis ends and their own comments begin!

Good luck in all your endeavours.

As of old: Be EMPOWERED and EXCEL!!

 

HOW TO WRITE AN EXCELLENT ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY

WRITING AN ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY is a skill that anyone in school needs to know, though it can be useful outside of the classroom, as well. High school students must write argumentative essays. They are not difficult to do, as long as one keeps these simple ideas in mind. With today’s Common Core standards, learning to write an essay that intelligently proves your point is an essential part of your education.

Network Monitoring Account

Here are some of the basic elements of an argumentative essay:

What is a Claim? – The thesis of one’s argumentative essay is a debatable claim. An essay is not an argumentative essay if it does not have a debatable claim. A claim is an assertion of something, but it must also be debatable. A debatable claim is a topic that clearly has two sides. Each side can be debated, which is why the claim is debatable. For example, “English should be the official language of the United States” is a debatable claim, and there are two sides to the issue.

What is an Appeal? – The writer of an argumentative essay will make appeals to her/his audience. There are three types of appeals:

  • Appeal to reason. The writer, appealing to his/her reader’s sense of logic, tends to make her argument citing facts, statistics, and in general, tends to rely on the reader using his sense of reason when reading the essay.
  • Appeal to emotion. When using this approach, the writer will appeal to the audience’s emotional side. Are there things about the argument that could make the reader upset or angry, in a way that will make him understand the writer’s argument?
  • Appeal to character. The writer must convince the reader that s/he is reliable and trustworthy. If s/he wants the readers to believe the argument, s/he must make them understand, through the writing, why s/he is credible.

Writers can use one or all of these appeals, and usually the most effective essays will use all three, even if one is used more than the others.

The structure of the argumentative essay is held together by the following:

A clear, concise, and defined thesis statement that occurs in the first paragraph of the essay. In the introductory paragraph of an argument essay, you should set the context by reviewing the topic in a general way. Your introduction should introduce and set up your point, rather than lay out evidence to support it. Also, while your introduction is a road map for the rest of the essay, you shouldn’t explicitly announce what and how you will be arguing. Next, the author should explain why the topic is important (exigence) or why readers should care about the issue. Lastly, students should present the thesis statement. If you do not master this portion of the essay, it will be quite difficult to compose an effective essay.

INTRODUCTION IDEAS – which may be mixed and matched – may include:

  • Use a true story – an anecdote.
  • Startling quotation, fact or statistic.
  • Scenario: imaginary story which illustrates the problem.
  • Explain the problem.
  • Describe vividly.
  • Frame story or flashback.

IN SHORT an introduction must have a brief explanation of your topic, some background information, and a thesis statement. In this case, your thesis is a statement of your position on a specific controversial topic.

Clear and logical transitions between the introduction, body, and conclusion. Transitions are the mortar that holds the foundation of the essay together. Without logical progression of thought, the reader is unable to follow the essay’s argument, and the structure will collapse. Transitions should wrap up the idea from the previous section and introduce the idea that is to follow in the next section.

Body paragraphs that include evidential support. Each paragraph should be limited to the discussion of one general idea. Thus, it is important to note that each paragraph in the body of the essay must have some logical connection to the thesis statement in the opening paragraph.

Evidential support. You will need to include well-researched, accurate, detailed, and current information to support the thesis statement and consider other points of view. Some factual, logical, statistical, or anecdotal evidence should support the thesis.

A conclusion that does not simply restate the thesis, but readdresses it in light of the evidence provided. Do not introduce any new information into the conclusion; rather, synthesize the information presented in the body of the essay. Restate why the topic is important, review the main points, and review your thesis. You may also want to include a short discussion of more research that should be completed in light of your work.

IN THE CONCULSION, try to make a final point which tells the reader what to think or do through engaging one or more these:

  • If your introduction had used a true story THEN your conclusion must show what will happen if your solution is adopted or people accept your argument.
  • If your introduction had a startling quotation, fact or statistic THEN in your conclusion use a real-life example of how your idea works.
  • If your introduction had scenario: imaginary story which illustrates the problem THEN your conclusion must revise the scenario showing what will happen if the reader adopts your ideas.
  • If your introduction had explained the problem THEN in conclusion tell the reader what they need to think, do, feel or believe.
  • If your introduction had described vividly THEN in conclusion you will need to appeal to the reader’s emotions, character or reason.
  • If your introduction had framed a story or flashback THEN in your conclusion you can finish the frame story.

Who Cares What the Opposing Side Has to Say?

Some points to note include:

  • The writer should care what the opposition says (because the reader certainly will).
  • If the writer simply ignores the other side, his argument will be dismissed.
  • Often, the best way to put together one’s essay is to look at the pros (arguments for the topic) and the cons (arguments against).
  • No matter what the writer’s viewpoint, it’s best for him to understand both sides.
  • Then, as he begins to construct his own argument, he can be sure to argue for his side and against his opposition.
  • As he refutes the other side, his argument naturally grows stronger.

It’s also wise to address the opposition because it shows the credibility of the author. If the writer simply ignores the other side, readers will not take him seriously.

Structure of Argumentative Essays

THE FIVE-PARAGRAPH ESSAY of an argumentative composition follows two of these general formats:

The Pros-Cons Structure

For this type of an argumentative essay, a student must have an INTRODUCTION followed by THREE body paragraphs presenting the pros of the argument, then offer the cons and finally a CONCLUSION in which the author states the desired side.

  • The writer states an initial thesis that contains the point of view for which the author is arguing.
  • The body generally presents both sides of the argument, although each con is refuted in turn in each paragraph.
  • The author may first present the pros of the argument, then offer the cons and refutation later in one paragraph.
  • The author presents the desired conclusion in the final paragraph.

The Pros-Cons and Refutation Structure

This type differs slightly from the above pros-cons structure. It starts with an INTRODUCTION followed by THREE body paragraphs presenting the pros/cons of the argument which are either way refuted in each individual paragraph. Finally the author presents the desired CONCLUSION in the penultimate paragraph.

  • The writer states an initial thesis that contains the point of view for which the author is arguing.
  • The three body paragraphs present both sides of the argument with either each pro or con both being presented and refuted in an individual paragraph.
  • The author presents the desired conclusion in the final paragraph.

The 1-2-1-1 Structure

For a basic argumentative essay, a student should structure the essay so that there are five paragraphs: An INTRODUCTION is followed by TWO support body paragraphs with the fourth paragraph being COUNTER ARGUMENT WITH REBUTTAL and finally a CONCLUSION

  • The first paragraph will be the introduction – Start out with an attention-getter; which must be an interesting fact about the topic or a quote from an authoritative source about the topic. This will be followed by a general overview of the topic, generally spanning three to four sentences. The final sentence of the introduction will be the thesis statement. It is imperative that the writer must provide a stance in this statement along with unelaborated reasons that support this stance.
  • The second and third paragraphs will be the support paragraphs – These are the support body paragraphs. Each of these paragraphs will start with a topic sentence; the topic is taken from the thesis statement. Within the paragraph, the student must have two specific examples that will follow the reason of support for each paragraph. The specific examples must be accompanied by elaboration. Students must display the connection to the thesis and explain the importance of including the examples.
  • The fourth paragraph will be the counter argument with rebuttalIt is an important paragraph. The writer will state the opposing side of the argument in this particular paragraph, followed by an explanation of this opposing side. However, the writer should not stop there. The counter argument must be followed by a rebuttal, or a reason why the counter argument is ineffective or wrong. This will further strengthen the initial position of the writer and give more credibility to the stance that the writer has chosen.
  • Final paragraph will be the conclusion. Finally, the writer must provide a conclusion in the final paragraph. The conclusion will start with a restatement of the thesis statement. This will be followed by an explanation of the significance of the topic and how it affects, or can affect, the reader and/or society. The conclusion will end with a call to action. This call to action will hopefully inspire people to do something that shows support of the original stance of the writer. These tips will ensure efficiency when writing an argumentative essay.

YES, argumentative essays are more difficult to write than, say, personal essays. But being able to argue one’s side in this type of essay is a valuable skill to learn. Students will use this technique all through High School (and possibly on the job, in later life).

Once a student learns how to write this type of essay, future essays are not as difficult.

Practice Questions

Write a well-structured argumentative essay of 400-450 words on one the topics:

  • Classmates are a more important influence than parents on a child’s success in school. Write an argumentative essay that supports your point of view.
  • Destroy what is old, Bring in the new.” In a rapidly changing world, what do you think of this opinion? Support your opinion with reasons and examples.
  • ‘Environmental issues will be the most important issues of the decade.” Do you agree? Write a well-structured essay in which you agree, disagree or partly agree with this statement. Support your opinion with reasons and examples.

quote-chalk-think-words.jpgGood luck in your endeavours.

As of old: Be EMPOWERED and EXCEL.

HOW TO WRITE AN EXCELLENT DISCURSIVE ESSAY @ HighSchool

pexels-photo-279415.jpegA DISCURSIVE ESSAY is a piece of formal writing that discusses a problem, a controversy, or a particular issue.

There are two basic kinds of discursive essays:

  • Persuasive essays in which you can argue strongly either in favour of or against a given discussion.
  • Argumentative essays.

Writing a discursive essay forces you to review all aspects and viewpoints of a particular topic, allowing you to think deeper and more critical.

TYPES OF DISCURSIVE ESSAYS

There are three main types of discursive essays of FIVE paragraphs each (400-450 words):

1. FOR AND AGAINST ESSAYS present both sides of an issue, discussing points in favour of a particular topic as well as those against, or the advantages and disadvantages of a particular question. Each point should be supported by justifications, examples, and/or reasons. The writer’s own opinion should be presented only in the final paragraph.

How to structure it: It has a generic introduction where you state the topic (without stating your opinion). In the next two paragraphs you present arguments for and justifications, examples or reasons. In the fourth paragraph you present arguments against and justifications, examples or reasons. Thus, in the conclusion you need to balance your consideration or opinion.

2. OPINION ESSAYS present the writer’s personal opinion concerning the topic, clearly stated and supported by reasons and/or examples. The opposing viewpoint and reason should be included in a separate paragraph before the closing one, together with an argument that shows it is an unconvincing viewpoint. The writer’s opinion should be included in the introduction, and summarized/restated in the conclusion.

How to structure it: It has a generic introduction in which you state the topic and your opinion followed by two paragraphs with viewpoints and reasons/ examples. So paragraph 4 will have the opposing viewpoint and reason/example. In your conclusion, you will have to summarise/restate your main opinion.

NB: For both FOR AND AGAINST ESSAYS and OPINION ESSAYS, remember to indicate, in a single paragraph, that there is another side to this argument, with some idea of the points likely to be made for the view(s) which are opposite to your own.

3. SOLUTIONS TO PROBLEMS ESSAYS, in which the problem(s) associated with a particular issue or situation are analysed and possible solutions are put forward, together with any expected results/consequences. The writer’s opinion may be mentioned, directly or indirectly, in the introduction and/or conclusion.

How to structure it: In the general introduction you state the problem and its cause(s)/effect(s). The other FOUR paragraphs look at suggestions and results. This will lead to the conclusion where you summarise your opinion.

Besides the three types above, many scholars are now engaged with the . . . .

ALTERNATE DISCURSIVE ESSAY – Here make sure you alternate from one argument to the other in an alternate manner, ie: you have an introduction then if you have written the second paragraph in support of the topic, then your third paragraph should be something against the topic and not in support of it. However, the fourth paragraph could be similar to paragraph two, supporting the topic as before.

To write the conclusion you need to sum up the key points, which you will have mentioned in the body paragraphs and based on the essay type, you can state your final position on the topic/statement, which can be either for or against, or even can be neither of the two. Also, remember that your conclusion is not just a repetition of the arguments you have mentioned in the body paragraphs, but a summary of the main findings.

This combination of alternate for and against paragraphs will make your essay look distinct, better and thoroughly researched and will result in a lasting impact on the reader’s mind.

ELEMENTS OF A DISCURSIVE ESSAY

Some of the distinguishing elements of a discursive essay are:

  • Its objectivity. It is important that the writer present the problem in an unbiased manner, discussing all points of argument thoroughly and carefully.
  • An introductory paragraph in which you clearly state the topic to be discussed or the issue’s relevance and context to other current issues
  • A main body – three body paragraphs – in which points are clearly stated in separate paragraphs and exemplified or justified;
  • Present each point in a separate paragraph. A well-developed paragraph contains a clear topic sentence, which summaries the contents of the paragraph, as well as a clear justification, explanation or example in support of the point presented.
  • It is written in a third-person perspective and avoid using first-person phrases such as “in my opinion,” “I believe,” and “I fully support.”
  • A closing paragraph summarising the main points of the essay, in which you stale/restate your opinion, and/or give a balanced consideration of the topic.

FORMAL STYLE

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Discursive essays are written in formal style. This means you should . . .

  • Write in passive voice, impersonal constructions, eg: (It is argued that . . .; It Is a common belief that . . . ). Thus, the writer remains neutral and detached from the topic (objective).
  • Points are listed sequentially with the most important points first.
  • Use a range of advanced vocabulary (verbs, adjectives, abstract nouns, etc)
  • Use sequencing (e.g. First/ly, Second/ly, etc) and linking words/phrases (e.g. however, although, furthermore, however, nonetheless)
  • Use complex sentences with a variety of links, dependent clauses, etc (e.g. Although it is widely accepted that . . . .)
  • Make references to other sources (e.g. Experts have proved that . . . )
  • Make generalisations (e.g. ln most developed countries, education . . . )
  • Inversion, especially in conditionals, (e.g. Were this true, we would . . . ; Never has this been more obvious . . . )
  • Use quotations, either word-for-word or in paraphrase, being careful to identify the source (e.g. As Winston Churchill said,”. . . )
  • Use RACPpERSEE! (There is a topic coming on this, in the Argumentative essay. Once you have mastered this acronym, you will see yourself excelling)

You should NOT use . . .

    • short forms (e.g. I’m, It’s) except when these are part of a quotation
    • colloquial expressions, phrasal verbs, idioms, (e.g. lots of, put up with, be over the moon about…)
    • very emotional language (e.g. I absolutely detest people who…)
    • express personal opinions too strongly (e.g. I know…); instead, use milder expressions (e.g. It seems to me that…)
    • simplistic vocabulary (e.g. Experts say they think this is bad….)
    • over-generalisation (e.g. All politicians are…)
    • refer blindly to statistics without accurate reference to their source (e.g. “A recent study showed…” – which study?)
    • a series of short sentences (e.g. Many people think so. They are wrong.)
    • personal examples (e.g. In my school…)
    • simple linking words (e.g. and, but, so) except for variety

So how do I take off?

Introducing A Discursive Essay

The opening of an essay is important. It should capture the reader’s attention in some way or another. It should avoid being bland or dull. It should invite the reader to read on and create a sense of interest. If the beginning is flat, it will not inspire your audience.

Methods of Opening a Discursive Essay

The following methods are suggestions from BBC’s Bitesize. It is up to you to decide which style suits your writing best.

  1. Provocativeeg. – “It is difficult to see how anyone can approve of fox hunting.”
  2. Balancedeg. – “Fox hunting is a subject about which people hold strongly contrasting views.”
  3. Quotation eg. – “Oscar Wilde once described fox hunting as ‘The unspeakable in pursuit of the uneatable.’.”
  4. Illustrationeg. – “On a glorious autumn morning a terrified, exhausted animal is savaged to death by a pack of baying dogs while a group of expensively dressed humans encourage the dogs in their bloody work.”
  5. Anecdoteeg. – “I have always detested fox hunting since I was almost physically sick while watching a television film of the kill at the end of a hunt.”

Linking Ideas In A Discursive Essay

Any well-written piece of discursive writing will flow as one continuous piece despite being made up of three or four different arguments. One of the techniques which can help you to achieve this effectively is the use of linking words. These words are usually used at the beginning of a new paragraph but can also be used to link ideas within a paragraph.

  • Same line of thought – eg: and, firstly, secondly etc., next, furthermore, likewise, in addition, similarly, also, moreover.
  • Conclusion/summary eg: – thus, therefore, consequently, accordingly, in retrospect, hence, in conclusion, in brief, as a result.
  • Definite statement eg: – without question, without doubt, unquestionably, absolutely.
  • Contrasting idea – eg: – yet, on the other hand, nevertheless, however, although, conversely, otherwise, on the contrary.
  • Further examples – eg: because, for instance, since, for example, so that, despite the fact that, accordingly, although, if, though, unless.

Discursive Essay Topics

Try one of these essays and then send it to me for marking. Write in about 400-450 words in length.

  1. “When people succeed, it is because of hard work. Luck has nothing to do with success.” Discuss.
  2. One should never judge a person by external appearances. Discuss.
  3. “Animals should be treated with the same respect as humans.” Do you agree with this view?
  4. “The generation gap is one which cannot be bridged.” Discuss.
  5. Do you believe that equality for women means that women should also do such things as military service?
  6. “One language spoken worldwide would lead to better international relations.” Discuss.
  7. Genetic engineering poses a number of worrying problems, both moral and practical. Discuss some of these problems and suggest what could be done to overcome them.
  8. “Celebrities should be allowed to keep their private lives private, without the invasion of the media.” Discuss.
  9. “Fear and ignorance are the root causes of racial hatred.” Discuss this state-ment and offer some possible solutions to the problem of racial prejudice.
  10. What are the advantages and disadvantages of our ever-increasing use of computer technology?

Good luck in your endeavours.

As of old: Be EMPOWERED and EXCEL.

ESSENTIAL STRATEGIES ON IMPROVING READING COMPREHENSION

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Sadly enough, MOST HIGH SCHOOLS no longer have students taking reading tests. However, when students are identified as not meeting adequate yearly progress in their reading, it is certain that there is a deficit in their reading foundational skills. Often-times, when students struggle in reading, educators mistakenly concentrate all of their efforts on improving comprehension. But in many cases, it is a lack of foundational reading skills— phonemic awareness and phonics, which lead to poor decoding skills—which result in students’ poor understanding.

In this post, I am exploring how High School teachers and students can approach Reading And Directed Writing in the classroom as well as essential strategies on how to tackle exam questions with aplomb and flair, that is, answering the questions precisely and accurately.

However, . . .

At High School, reading comprehension is essential.

READING COMPREHENSION is the ability to understand, remember, and communicate meaning from what has been read.

READING STRATEGIES are crucial for any reader. Once students have adequate decoding and vocabulary skills to allow for fluent reading, their understanding can be improved by instructing students to develop a routine for reading which includes specific strategies that can be employed throughout the reading process (before, during, and after) that increase their awareness and understanding of a text.

These strategies include the following:

BEFORE READING 

Preview the text on how the writer’s background and purpose influence what they write. In a way reading a text critically requires you to ask questions about the writer’s authority and agenda. You may need to put yourself in the author’s shoes and recognize how those shoes fit a certain way of thinking.

DURING READING

Monitor their own reading, generate questions about the text; and identify and organize ideas based on a text’s structure.

Engaging and Connecting with the Text – Once students have addressed unfamiliar words through previewing, they can really engage with the text as they read it by visualizing, focusing on the content, generating questions, and identifying and organizing text structure to improve understanding of the material.

The following are effective strategies that help students engage with a text:

Annotating Text – Marking important text or taking notes about information that is important will help students remember the essentials of a reading passage.

Using Questioning Strategies – Questioning strategies help the reader to clarify and comprehend what he/she is reading. Direct students to develop these as they read and to use cue words, such as who, what, where, when, and why, to guide them in order to make effective questions.

Identifying and Organizing Text Structure – The way an author organizes information in a passage can help the reader increase their understanding of the text.

AFTER READING 

Answer high-level questions and summarize the text.

Having students review and summarize material after reading gives you a simple way to ensure that they understood what they read. Retelling challenges them to retain what they read. Summarization allows them to discriminate between main ideas and minor details.

Rereading is the most effective strategy to increase one’s knowledge of the text. Students should be encouraged to do this especially when they encounter a difficult and challenging piece of text.

As most answers come directly from the passage or text being read, students should always be able to support their answer choices with specific quotations from the text. They must not answer the questions by memory alone nor rely on their own knowledge or opinion of the subject but must answer with particular reference to the text read.

17 Ideas On Teaching Students’ Reading Comprehension

Comprehension strategies are conscious plans — sets of steps that good readers use to make sense of a text. The ideas suggested here help students become purposeful, active readers who are in control of their own reading comprehension: C.R. Adler has identified strategies to teach text comprehension which include:

  1. Activating – This is “priming the cognitive pump” in order to recall relevant prior knowledge and experiences from long-term memory in order to extract and construct meaning from text.
  2. Monitoring Comprehension – Students who are good at monitoring their comprehension know when they understand what they read and when they do not. They have strategies to “fix” problems in their understanding as the problems arise. Research shows that instruction, even in the early grades, can help students become better at monitoring their comprehension. Comprehension monitoring instruction teaches students to:
    1. Be aware of what they do understand
    2. Identify what they do not understand
    3. Use appropriate strategies to resolve problems in comprehension
  3. Establish The Main Idea: Check the first and last sentences of every paragraph, or the first and last paragraphs in the passage. As you read, continually ask yourself what the main idea of the paragraph is, how that idea is explained or illustrated, and how that paragraph connects with the rest of the passage.
  4. Metacognition – It can be defined as “thinking about thinking.” Good readers use metacognitive strategies to think about and have control over their reading. Before reading, they might clarify their purpose for reading and preview the text. During reading, they might monitor their understanding, adjusting their reading speed to fit the difficulty of the text and “fixing” any comprehension problems they have. After reading, they check their understanding of what they read.
  5. Inferring – Bringing together what is spoken (written) in the text, what is unspoken (unwritten) in the text, and what is already known by the reader in order to extract and construct meaning from the text.
  6. Specific Details – Use line references when they are given. Make sure you are circling/underlining efficiently as you read so you can locate information quickly. Circle key words in the question and then scan the passage to find them or their synonyms.
  7. Tone/Attitude – How is the author emotionally engaged with the subject? Know the following words: aloof, ambivalent, apathetic, callous, candid, caustic, cautionary, condescending, contemplative, contemptuous, cynical, derisive, detached, didactic, disparaging, dispassionate, erudite, flippant, forthright, grudging, incredulous, indignant, indifferent, ironic, jaded, judicious, laudatory, malicious, naïve, nostalgic, patronizing, pedantic, pompous, pragmatic, prosaic, resigned, reverent, sardonic, satirical, skeptical, trite, vindictive, whimsical.
  8. Vocabulary In Context – Many of the words have multiple possible meanings, so you must always look back to the passage to decide how the author is using the word in context. Substitute each answer choice for the word in the sentence and see if it makes sense, even the tense choice. For unfamiliar words, look for clues nearby in the passage.
  9. Backward and Forward Monitoring – Students may use several comprehension monitoring strategies:
  • Identify where the difficulty occurs, eg: “I don’t understand the second paragraph on page 76.”
  • Identify what the difficulty is, eg: “I don’t get what the author means when she says . . . “
  • Restate the difficult sentence or passage in their own words
  • Look back through the text
  • Look forward in the text for information that might help them to resolve the difficulty
  1. Graphic and Semantic Organizers – Graphic organizers illustrate concepts and relationships between concepts in a text or using diagrams. Graphic organizers are known by different names, such as maps, webs, graphs, charts, frames, or clusters.

These are also seen as visualizing, organizing and constructing a mental image or graphic organizer for the purpose of extracting and constructing meaning from the text. Graphic organizers (venn-diagrams, storyboard/chain of events, story map or cause/effect) can:

  • Help students focus on text structure “differences between fiction and nonfiction” as they read
  • Provide students with tools they can use to examine and show relationships in a text
  • Help students write well-organized summaries of a text
  1. Answering Questions – Questions can be effective because they:
  • Give students a purpose for reading
  • Focus students’ attention on what they are to learn
  • Help students to think actively as they read
  • Encourage students to monitor their comprehension
  • Help students to review content and relate what they have learned to what they already know

The Question-Answer Relationship strategy (QAR) encourages students to learn how to answer questions better. Students are asked to indicate whether the information they used to answer questions about the text was textually explicit information (information that was directly stated in the text), textually implicit information (information that was implied in the text), or information entirely from the student’s own background knowledge.

There are four different types of questions:

  • “Right There” – Questions found right in the text that ask students to find the one right answer located in one place as a word or a sentence in the passage. Example: Who is Frog’s friend? Answer: Toad
  • “Think and Search” – Questions based on the recall of facts that can be found directly in the text. Answers are typically found in more than one place, thus requiring students to “think” and “search” through the passage to find the answer. Example: Why was Frog sad? Answer: His friend was leaving.
  • “Author and You” Questions require students to use what they already know, with what they have learned from reading the text. Student’s must understand the text and relate it to their prior knowledge before answering the question. Example: How do think Frog felt when he found Toad? Answer: I think that Frog felt happy because he had not seen Toad in a long time. I feel happy when I get to see my friend who lives far away.
  • “On Your Own” Questions are answered based on a students prior knowledge and experiences. Reading the text may not be helpful to them when answering this type of question. Example: How would you feel if your best friend moved away? Answer: I would feel very sad if my best friend moved away because I would miss her.

12. Generating Questions – By generating questions, students become aware of whether they can answer the questions and if they understand what they are reading. Students learn to ask themselves questions that require them to combine information from different segments of text. For example, students can be taught to ask main idea questions that relate to important information in a text.

13. Monitoring and Clarifying – Thinking about how and what one is reading, both during and after the act of reading, for purposes of determining if one is comprehending the text combined with the ability to clarify and fix up any mix-ups.

14. Recognizing Story Structure – In story structure instruction, students learn to identify the categories of content (characters, setting, events, problem, resolution). Often, students learn to recognize story structure through the use of story maps. Instruction in story structure improves students’ comprehension.

15. Summarizing – Summarizing requires students to determine what is important in what they are reading and to put it into their own words. Instruction in summarizing helps students:

    • Identify or generate main ideas
    • Connect the main or central ideas
    • Eliminate unnecessary information
    • Remember what they read

16. Searching and Selecting – Searching a variety of sources in order to select appropriate information to answer questions, define words and terms, clarify misunderstandings, solve problems, or gather information.

17. Identifying Techniques – How does the author structure his/her argument? Is the passage meant to teach, persuade, or describe? Is the argument objective or subjective? What is the author’s thesis? What type of evidence is used? Does the author quote his sources, or simply cite their names or titles? Are the ideas concrete or abstract? Does the author give specific details or rely on generalizations?

pexels-photo-261895.jpegEffective Comprehension Instruction

Research shows that explicit teaching techniques are particularly effective for comprehension strategy instruction. In explicit instruction, teachers tell readers why and when they should use strategies, what strategies to use, and how to apply them. The steps of explicit instruction typically include direct explanation, teacher modeling (“thinking aloud”), guided practice, and application.

  • Direct explanation – The teacher explains to students why the strategy helps comprehension and when to apply the strategy.
  • Modeling – The teacher models, or demonstrates, how to apply the strategy, usually by “thinking aloud” while reading the text that the students are using.
  • Guided practice – The teacher guides and assists students as they learn how and when to apply the strategy.
  • Application – The teacher helps students practice the strategy until they can apply it independently.

Work To Understand Your Own Strategies And To Improve Them

  • Ask yourself questions about how you read: Do you read too quickly or slowly? Do you tend to lose your focus? Can you scan for key information or ideas?
  • Consider the characteristics of effective reading above, in relation to those practices and strategies you already employ, to get a sense of your current reading strategies and how they might be improved.

Just as having more than one conversation with another person leads to closer understanding; conducting a number of readings lead to a richer and more meaningful relationship with, and understanding of a text.

This, essentially, requires a lot of practice.

Good luck in all your endeavours.

As of old: Be EMPOWERED and EXCEL!

BRILLIANT IDEAS ON APPROACHING A DESCRIPTIVE COMPOSITION

The moon with its wisps of white light hung suspended in the frosty air over the still, quiet countryside. He could see in all directions, from the majestic outcrop of mountains to the vast ocean on the other.

The reader can certainly SEE the moon and the countryside.

  • DESCRIPTIVE WRITING focuses on observation, is static, and paints pictures with words. Someone or something can be described.
  • DESCRIPTIVE WRITING is about using words that give your readers the details they need to visualize what you are saying and become a part of your writing.

In a descriptive composition, the writer describes something to allow the reader to experience the topic being described as vividly as possible. Thus,

SHOW, DON’T TELL!

HS Teacher and StudentWORD POWER – Descriptive writing is writing with flair.  It means using words so that they paint a picture for the reader, but doing so in ways that often surprise the reader. Those words and expressions are chosen carefully to achieve the desired effect.

Here are some of the tools available to you when dealing with descriptive writing:

USE YOUR FIVE SENSES

Images of sight, sound, hearing, taste and touch can be used to make the description vivid. So to bring your writing to life and truly immerse your readers in the story, be sure to engage all of their senses. The key to unlocking the five senses is the question behind it. The question of why you are seeing, hearing, tasting, smelling, or feeling something will help a lot.

TASK: Imagine you are walking outside. A spring storm is coming. Describe for your classmates what you see, hear, smell, taste, and touch.

SIMILES

These are comparisons using the words “like” or “as” (simile)

Instead of saying:

    • “The bread is hard,” SAY “The bread is as hard as a rock.”
    • The surface of the moon is like crumpled sandpaper

METAPHORS

These are comparisons minus cue words

  • My tears were a river.                     I died with embarrassment
  • Her heart was on fire.                     He hit the wall of exhaustion

ADJECTIVES

These are words which describe or modify nouns.

  • The tall, thin man entered the spooky room with measured steps.  Inside the room deep shadows crouched in wait for him.

ADVERBS

These are words which describe or modify verbs.

  • The jets dived steeply out of the sky, tumbling rapidly as they maneuvered gracefully past each other.

PERSONIFICATION OR HYPERBOLE

They add interest to inanimate objects.

  •  Instead of saying:
    • My heart started beating fast. SAY: My heart leaped out of my chest.

INTERESTING VERBS

It is worthwhile taking the time to think about the verb for the situation you are trying to bring to life.  Often, a carefully chosen verb can transform a so-so passage into something quite different.

  • He ran.                                   He jogged.
  • He fled.                                   He sprinted away/ He stormed off.

CHARACTER, PLACE AND ACTION

The best descriptions have a focus. They aren’t just lists of everything in the scene thrown together. Try concentrating on character – bring it to life!

SHOW, DON’T TELL:

This would be telling your readers:

  • He walked over to the stage and they gave him the award. 

This, instead, is showing your readers:

  • His feet felt like they were walking on air, as he glided towards the stage. An award like this was a dream he could never have imagined coming true.

Your readers will feel like a movie is showing inside their heads, because you gave them all the details they needed to truly “see” it.

Here are four tips that will help you add vivid descriptions to your writing:

  • Use your five senses.
  • Use figurative language.
  • Have fun with words.
  • Show, don’t tell.

pexels-photo.jpgTASK: Identify all the descriptive words and techniques used. Then, comment on the effectiveness of using such words in your descriptive composition writing.

Look at this . . .

  • When I think of the home town of my youth, all that I seem to remember is dust- the brown, crumbly dust of late summer- arid, sterile dust that gets into the eyes and makes them water, gets into the throat and between the toes of bare brown feet. I don’t know why I should remember only the dust… And so, when I think of that time and that place, I remember only the dry September of the dirt roads and grassless yards of the shanty-town where I lived.

What about this one?

  • The waves roar like a lion, as they hit the crumbling cliffs very powerfully. The white spray is thrown against the shore, and the vicious waves gnaw on the jagged pebbles. The wind cries loudly, weeping and moaning in the rain. The roof of the fragile, isolated beach hut is hit by the gales; its frost-bitten structure decaying in the briny tempest. At the edge of the jagged pebbles, where there are reeds and grasses you can see the remains of a snow fall which is like cotton wool. Colourless clouds carefully caress the horizon and a few brave seagulls fight against the fierce currents. Surely nothing can survive for long.

What’s wrong with the following?

  • The lighthouse goes up into the sky. I can see its spotlight and I can hear it moving around. I can also hear the waves. They are moving back and forth on the shore. Sometimes the waves splash over me. I look again at the lighthouse in the distance.

Why is this better?

  • The lighthouse soars up into the cold night air.  The low grown of its rotating spotlight struggles like the moan of a wounded animal.  Reluctantly, the waves retreat, sucked back into the darkness, then angrily return, pounding the foot of the mighty stone structure.  The spray showers over me and my mouth fills with the cold taste of the sea.  The lighthouse stands stern, a forbidding guardian of the shore.

So how did you fair? For you to get it right and become excellent, you need to practice. Take time to write and see yourself improving.

Good luck in your endeavours.

As of old: Be EMPOWERED and EXCEL!